In order to inform you as much as possible, we have answered a selection of the most frequently asked questions we receive and collected extra information for you.

If you have a question that isn’t answered here, please feel free to contact us and we will help you out as soon as possible.

Ísafold Travel is located at Smiðshöfði 21 in 110 Reykjavík – which is located about 10 minutes from downtown Reykjavík. More information about our company can be found on our about us page.

Our offices are opened every weekday from 8.00am until 5.00pm. More information about our company can be found on our about us page.

It’s possible to contact us using the following channels:

+354 518 7200 (between 8.00am and 5.00pm from Monday until Friday)
info@isafoldtravel.is

 

or send us a message using the form below:

 




It is possible to be charged in other currencies. However all calculations and offers are done in Icelandic Krona. The currency converter on our website is only a reference and uses the exchange rate on the day you use it. Prices in currencies other than the Icelandic Krona may vary from day to day.

Ísafold Travel accepts VISA, MasterCard and American Express credit cards. Should you wish to pay by other methods, such as Wire Transfer, please contact us on info@isafoldtravel.is prior to making the booking.

All cancellations must be made by e-mail or letter. In conformity with business practices within the Icelandic travel industry, the travel agent is obliged to charge cancellation fees to passenger(s) as follows, in addition to the non-refundable deposit:

More than 6 weeks prior to arrival: No additional charge
Less than 6 weeks and more than 2 weeks: 15%
Less than 2 weeks and more than 72 hours: 50%
Less than 72 hours and more than 24 hours: 75%

Less than 24 hours notice, and no-shows: 100%

We recommend that all passengers take out comprehensive travel insurance.

Ísafold Travel does not offer travel insurance. We recommend that all clients take out comprehensive travel insurance.

Ísafold Travel does not handle or book international or domestic flights for our clients. However, if requested we do organise everything from your arrival in Iceland up to your departure with an international flight. None of our tours require the use of domestic flights and are all driven by car, jeep or mini bus – in either a self-drive or fully guided package.

A self-drive or self-guided tour is a packaged tour that allows you to travel at your own pace – by yourself or in a group. We arrange everything from the vehicle to accommodation so you don’t have to worry about anything. You can just go and enjoy your own private road trip through Iceland.

The Northern Lights, or Aurora Borealis, are only visible when the nights are dark enough. This means they can be seen as of late August until end of April in Iceland. Outside of this period there is too much sunlight during night time which blocks out any chance of seeing any activity. So generally speaking it is only visible in winter time.

There are a few of things that have to be taken into account:

  • Seeing the aurora greatly depends on how cloudy it is and how much solar activity there is. This information can be found on the Icelandic Met Office website.
  • The aurora can be sometimes be seen from within the city limits but with lower activity you increase the odds of seeing it by going away from any kind of light pollution.

When it’s winter time, the days are a lot shorter compared to summer but this does not mean that Iceland is covered in darkness all day long. Iceland is not on a high enough latitude for it to be covered in darkness every minute of the day.

To give you an idea of what to expect: on December 21st, the shortest day of the year, Iceland gets sunlight from around 11.30am until 3.30pm. Before and after that period of sunlight there is also a period of twilight which is not pitch dark.

Puffins are migratory birds and spend most of their lives at sea and only come to shore to breed. This means that they can only be spotted a few months a year near the Icelandic coast. Generally speaking this period lasts from the second half of May until the first half of August. This timeframe could change depending on climate conditions. If the weather has been warmer, some birds might leave Iceland earlier.

Puffins make their nests in or near cliffs. Some of the best puffin location include Dýrholæy, Vestmannayjær (Westman Islands), Borgarfjörður-Eystri and Ingólfshöfði. There are also boat tours being organised from Reykjavík. These mainly take you to Lundey, an island close to Reykjavík where a lot of puffins come to breed.

Icelanders tend to say that if you don’t like the weather, just wait 5 minutes and it will change.

The Icelandic weather is very different between the seasons and can be very localised also. Be sure to keep an eye on the Icelandic Met Office website during your trip. Below is a short overview of what to expect in different seasons:

Winter

The temperature during winter is relatively mild for its latitude, with an average temperature of 0°C on the southern parts of the island and -5°C in the North. The Icelandic highlands usually float around -10°C.  Snow is to be expected in most parts of the country as well as strong winds and gusts. The weather can be very unstable during Winter. It usually lasts from the end of October to first half of April.

Spring

Spring is considered to last from April until the first half of June. The first day of spring is usually celebrated the first Thursday after April 18th but it’s not uncommon for it to snow on this day. The days are getting longer, the weather more stable and the average temperature is getting higher, with an average of about 7°C. Spring is heralded in by the migratory birds arriving to the island and the flowers blooming.

Summer

The second half of June, July and first half of August are considered to be the summer period in Iceland. The weather is relatively stable. Average temperature usually floats around 10-11°C. In the summer of 1939 the highest temperature ever recorded in Iceland was measured (30,5°C) in the East Fjords. Don’t expect that any time soon though!

Autumn

In September the temperature starts to drop and the weather is becoming more unstable. Autumn storms with very strong winds are not uncommon. The days are getting shorter at a fast pace and the Northern Lights can be seen again. The lush green plants and bushes start to change colours very fast and the average temperature floats around 5°C.

All off-road driving and driving outside of marked tracks is prohibited by law and is considered a very serious crime.

Driving a vehicle off road, that is not on a track, so that it damages the natural environment or leaves a mark carries heavy fines up to 500.000 ISK and/or up to 2 years in jail. The exception would be if driving on surfaces where the vehicle does not leave a scar in the land. Like when fording rivers or driving on snow covered surfaces. Icelandic nature is delicate and tire tracks from off-road driving can cause substantial damage to the vegetation and leave marks that will last for decades.

Keep in mind that the Icelandic nature is very fragile, especially in the highlands, and we would like to enjoy it for generations to come. Please respect nature and tread carefully.

Iceland offers travellers an adventure of a lifetime in a beautiful and rugged landscape. However, experience shows that the forces of Icelandic nature can be harsh and unpredictable, and travellers are well-advised to exercise caution and respect for the country’s natural environment.

When driving in Iceland there are a few things travellers should keep in mind:

Speed limits and driving laws

  • The speed limit on Iceland’s route 1 or the ring road as it’s called is 90 km/h. On gravel roads the speed limit is 80 km/h. And in populated areas the limit is 30-50 km/h.
  • By law everyone in the car has to wear seat belts.
  • It is mandatory to drive with the headlights on at all times, night or day, summer or winter.
  • Driving after consuming alcohol is strictly forbidden and can carry heavy fines and loss of drivers permit.

Off-road driving

All off-road driving and driving outside of marked tracks is prohibited by law and is considered a very serious crime. Driving a vehicle off road, that is not on a track, so that it damages the natural environment or leaves a mark carries heavy fines up to 500.000 ISK and/or up to 2 years in jail. The exception would be if driving on surfaces where the vehicle does not leave a scar in the land. Like when fording rivers or driving on snow covered surfaces. Icelandic nature is delicate and tire tracks from off-road driving can cause substantial damage to the vegetation and leave marks that will last for decades.

Keep in mind that the Icelandic nature is very fragile, especially in the highlands, and we would like to enjoy it for generations to come. Please respect nature and tread carefully.

Highland and mountain roads

A 4×4 vehicle is essential in the highlands, where you might encounter rough terrain and unbridged waters. Most mountain roads and roads in the interior of Iceland have a gravel surface. The surface on the gravel roads is often loose, especially along the sides of the roads, so one should drive carefully and slow down whenever an oncoming car approaches. The mountain roads are also often very narrow, and are not made for speeding. The same goes for many bridges, which are only wide enough for one car at a time. Journeys may therefore take longer than expected.

The Icelandic highland roads are closed in the spring when the snow is melting. Although it can vary considerably from year to year, usually the majority will open around the 3rd week of June. In the winter most highland roads are deemed “impassable”, but they often stay open until late autumn.

For up to date information on road conditions and openings, please visit the website of the Icelandic Road Administration.

Weather

Icelandic weather can be very harsh at times and change extremely quickly. Icelanders are wont to say: ,,In Iceland you can experience all the four seasons in one day”. Keep a close eye on the weather forecast, and be sure that you have the right vehicle and proper equipment for your journey.

When driving in winter, you can expect to face snow, icy roads and darkness. If you are travelling outside of populated areas, always make sure that you check weather conditions and report your planned route to someone.

Information on weather and weather forecasts can be found at the Icelandic Meteorological Office’s website.

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